Wonder Women 2016: Full Events Listings

0 Posted by 20 January 2016
  • Ovid's Heroines_079

    Reading Ovid's Heroines.

  • What are we chaining ourselves to the railings for?

    What are we chaining ourselves to the railings for today? People's History Musuem.

  • Ellie and Vanhessa Mean Girls Exposed resize

    Ellie and Vanhessa Mean Girls Exposed.

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The full event listings for Wonder Women, running across Manchester 3–13 March 2016.

Not all events are on sale yet – follow Wonder Women on Facebook and Twitter for the latest ticketing information.

Monday 7 March

EXHIBITION. Annot Robinson: A Scottish Suffragette in Manchester

This exhibition looks at the life of Annot Robinson who was a crucial part of the Votes for Women campaigns, a staunch socialist agitating for equal pay for the women in munitions in WW1, a pacifist who organised the lively Women’s Peace Crusades across the country in 1917-1918 and worked tirelessly for the Women’s International League in Ireland and USA.  Manchester Central Library, 7th-31st March, Free 


EVENT. Women’s sexual pleasure workshop

Explore women’s sexual pleasure through the use of a range of materials and artefacts. Topics will include sexual stimulation and practices, physiological responses as well as orgasm and ejaculation. The workshop will conclude with an optional activity exploring solo or partnered masturbation and a ‘make your own sex toy’ session using everyday items and recycled materials. Suitable for self-identified women, aged 16 years and older. Spaces limited. Facilitators: Ali Hanbury and Rachael Eastham. Castlefield Gallery, 7 March, 6pm-8pm, SOLD OUT

EVENT. FLIM NITE presents Thelma and Louise

What would Thelma and Louise look like distorted by poets, comedians, and musicians? A re-telling of this classic film through an exciting mix of live art; each performer has been given a chunk of Thelma and Louise to turn into something new, transforming a kick-ass pro-feminist road movie into something unrecognisable, for your viewing pleasure. 3 Minute Theatre, 7 March, 7.30pm, Suggested donation £2

Tuesday 8 March – INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

TALK. Campaigners, Conductors and Canaries

This hour-long talk looks at the varied roles Salford women had during World War One, and how their lives changed during this time. Salford Museum and Art Gallery, 8 March, 11am, £2, no booking required

EVENT. National Football Museum Tours

Guided tours of The National Football Museum focusing on the women’s game, from the incredibly successful Dick Kerr’s Ladies team of the early 20th century to the rise again of women’s football in recent years. Get a closer look at the stories and items in the museum’s collection, giving you a greater understanding of the challenges faced by women who wanted to play the game in the 20th century. National Football Museum, 8 March, 11am & 3pm, last approx 45 minutes and include refreshments, £4.

PERFORMANCE. Living History performance: The Hard Way Up – A Suffragette’s Story

Celebrate International Women’s Day with a Living History performance based on the life of suffragette Hannah Mitchell, who spoke out for women and the poor and became a peace campaigner after World War I. Family Friendly event. Suitable for over 7s to adults. Peoples History Museum, 8 March, 1.15pm-2pm, booking required, suggested donation £3 

WALKING TOUR. Herstory

For generations, Manchester’s women have been at the forefront of social and economic change, yet their voices are rarely heard. This International Women’s Day walking tour celebrates some of Manchester’s most influential female exports, from Mabel Tylecote to Marie Stopes, Elizabeth Gaskell and the Pankhursts. Starting at All Saint’s Park, Oxford Road, 8 March, 2pm, SOLD OUT  

EVENT. Dear Friend Letter-writing workshop

Dear Friend is an online letter-writing project celebrating women who stood up for others, both in the past and present. Write a letter to support a woman who inspired you or who made a difference in an area of equality, such as the fight against slavery, racial discrimination, or the ongoing fight for peace. This event also features a Living History performance, focussing on local councillor, suffragist, and peace campaigner Hannah Mitchell. People’s History Museum, 8 March, 2.15pm-4.15pm, free

FILM. Born in Flames

Director Lizzie Borden’s skillful and provocative blending of art and activism achieved instant recognition as a seminal chapter in both independent and feminist film-making. The film is intended as a political discovery process and an attempt to show how a microcosm of black, white and Hispanic women could all come together to address issues of inequality within the context of the workplace and society as a whole. Highlighting the emerging feminist sensibility at the beginning of the Reaganite administration, it’s an allegorical tale that inventively and resourcefully draws upon elements of the science fiction genre. This screening will be introduced by Dr Monica Pearl, Lecturer in 20th Century American Literature at the University of Manchester. HOME, 8 March, 6.20pm, tickets £7/ £5 concessions

DISCUSSION. Men Are the Losers Now. Discuss Manchester in association with Guardian Live.

Young girls are increasingly told they can be whatever they’d like to be, but boys are still brought up in a culture that celebrates macho and ignores male depression. So, Are Men The Losers Now? A panel of speakers including performer, writer and transgender activist Kate O’Donnell, debate for and against this provocative motion, exploring the benefits of raising boys the same as girls, gender stereotyping and masculine pressures, the lag in encouraging boys into traditionally female-dominated industries and advances in IVF meaning women don’t need a male partner to conceive. What is it like growing up as a boy and how does this affect the progress of equality for women? People’s History Museum, 8 March, 6.30pm, £7 book now.

 

Wednesday 9 March

EVENT. Maxine Peake’s Hamlet and Women in the Creative Industries

The British Council celebrates the role of women in the creative industries and explores how Shakespeare’s work can influence them with a screening of Sarah Frankcom’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s iconic play, Hamlet. Starring Maxine Peake, this powerful play is about loyalty, betrayal, love, murder and madness. A lively and thought-provoking panel discussion follows on the role of women in the creative industries. The panel encourages those present to critically explore gender roles and challenge the barriers that still exist. This event is invitation only. For those interested in attending, The British Council is asking for your help to stimulate some early discussion in return for a free ticket. Suggest a question for the panel or tell them why you think Hamlet is so relevant to the lives of women today. Please email questions and comments to Amy Rogers. HOME, 9 March, 12.30 – 5.30pm, invitation only.

EVENT. Vanilla Shakes? Exploring Sexual Coupledom and the Everyday

The liberalisation of both sexual regulation and attitudes since the 1960s has given rise to the assumption that western cultures are sexually liberated. Within this context, sociological debate around intimate relationships has focused on changes in sexual practices. A key assertion is that heterosexuality is losing its associations with wider gender inequalities and, as such, is no longer privileged as the norm. In everyday life heterosexuality appears to maintain its status as the normative form of sexuality, and long-term couple relationships remain the dominant form. This event foregrounds the everyday life of the sexual couple to explore what constitutes ‘everyday, mundane, conventional sexual lives’ at the beginning of the twenty-first century. 70 Oxford Street, 9 March, 6pm-8pm, free, booking required

EVENT. Mary Wollstonecraft and Mary Shelley

Professor Sharon Ruston joins audiences at The Portico to speak about two radical women. The first is Mary Wollstonecraft, feminist writer and author of Vindication of the Rights of Woman, generally considered the first book to articulate an idea of female equality. The second is her daughter, Mary Shelley, who 200 years ago wrote the terrifying ’tale of wonder’, Frankenstein.  The Portico, 9 March, 6pm, book now: £5.41 – £7.52

EXHIBITION. Freedom or Death? The Women’s Suffrage Movement

John Rylands Library holds key archives of the women’s suffrage movement in early 19th century Britain. Join them as they look at original documents providing a captivating insight into the social and economic, as well as political position of women in the early twentieth century. John Rylands Library, 9 March, 2pm-3pm, free

PERFORMANCE. Bridget Christie: A Book For Her

Why has Bridget Christie been sending her stained underpants to George Osborne at HM Treasury every month? Which method actor has been playing the character comedian Nigel Farage since 2010? Is Rachel Dolezal black or white? What’s the difference between Eddie Izzard and Caitlyn Jenner? All this and more will be revealed in Bridget’s tenth solo show, followed by a post-show book signing. The Lowry, 9 March, 8pm, tickets £18 plus booking fee  

PERFORMANCE. Bryony Kimmings and Tim Grayburn: Fake It Til You Make It

Fake It Til You Make It is Bryony Kimmings’ new work about clinical depression and men… from two people who know all about it. Expect homemade music, stupid dancing, onstage arguments, real-life stories, tears and truths in this Edinburgh Fringe First Winner. A wickedly warming, brutally honest and heart-breaking show about the wonders and pitfalls of the human brain, being in love and what it takes to be a ‘real man’.  A twist for Wonder Women with an event exploring how gender stereotypes manifest inhibitions in men. Contact, 9 March, 8pm, SOLD OUT 

PERFORMANCE. Sandi Toksvig: Live! Politically Incorrect

Sandi Toksvig – comedian, novelist, actor, broadcaster, university chancellor, and (inter)national treasure, MC. She now finds herself in the startling position of having co-founded the UK’s fastest growing political party, the Women’s Equality Party. Sandi is celebrating the launch of the party with a fundraising tour of a uniquely witty evening of her stand-up, stories and fascinating facts. Sandi will entertain us solo for the first half of the evening and in the second she will introduce us to some special guests and ideas behind this exciting new venture. The Lowry, 9 March, 7.30pm, ticket £25.50 plus booking fee

Thursday 10 March

PERFORMANCE. Bryony Kimmings and Tim Grayburn: Fake It Til You Make It

Fake It Til You Make It is Bryony Kimmings’ new work about clinical depression and men… from two people who know all about it. Expect homemade music, stupid dancing, onstage arguments, real-life stories, tears and truths in this Edinburgh Fringe First Winner. A wickedly warming, brutally honest and heart-breaking show about the wonders and pitfalls of the human brain, being in love and what it takes to be a ‘real man’.  A twist for Wonder Women with an event exploring how gender stereotypes manifest inhibitions in men. Contact, 10 March, 8pm, tickets £15/ £10 concessions 

EVENT. Thursday Lates Wonder Women Takeover

An evening of music, literature and performance inspired by the Whitworth’s exhibitions, collections and spaces. Comedians, writers, performers and thinkers investigate feminist overtones of the gallery’s collection to curate an evening that provokes, subverts and satires identity, gender and sexuality. The Feminist Thursday Late will take over the gallery with conversations, performance, music and even an art pub quiz. Whitworth, 10 March, 6pm-9pm, free

TALK. The portrayal of women in Victorian Art

This talk and tour investigates the depictions of women in Victorian items throughout the collection and on display in the Victorian Gallery. Salford Museum and Art Gallery, 10 March, 11am-2pm, £2, no booking required

EVENT. Written in The Margins

Manchester Jewish Museum opens its doors to celebrate female writers in an evening of hands-on workshops, live music, performance and discussion. Stuart Maconie chairs Brighter Sound’s panel of journalists and musicians discussing how gender has become a genre and the impact of written media on female representation. Artist Cherry Styles invites audiences to get creative with a hands-on zine workshop and acclaimed poet Clare Pollard performs her version of Ovid’s ‘Heroides’ (renamed ‘Heroines’). In response to Pollard’s poems, multi-instrumentalists Serafina Steer and Natalie Sharp debut an original piece of music commissioned by Brighter Sound.

6pm onwards – Hands-on zine workshop (drop-in)
6:45pm – 7:45pm – Clare Pollard performs Ovid’s Heroines
8pm – 8:45pm: Brighter Sound panel discussion
9pm – 9:30pm: Serafina Steer performance

Age limit 15+. Manchester Jewish Museum, 10 March, 6pm, tickets £3 advance, £5 OTD

WALKING TOUR. Herstory

For generations, Manchester’s women have been at the forefront of social and economic change, yet their voices are rarely heard. This International Women’s Day walking tour celebrates some of Manchester’s most influential female exports, from Mabel Tylecote to Marie Stopes, Elizabeth Gaskell and the Pankhursts. Starting at All Saint’s Park, Oxford Road, 10 March, 2pm, SOLD OUT. 

Friday 11 March

EXHIBITION. No job for a man! Midwives versus The Medical Men

Explore the Medical Manuscripts Collection at John Rylands Library and discover the attitudes and practices of early 18th and 19th century midwifery and in particular the fascinating rise of the ‘man midwife’. John Rylands Library, 11 March, 2pm-3pm, free

EVENT. Drawing Strength: Costumed Life Drawing and Contemporary Interventions

Bury Art Museum stays open into the night in this unique event inspired by International Women’s Day. Celebrating inspirational and trailblazing women, the museum will be holding costumed life drawing sessions, one day displays, specially focused guided tours and more over the course of one evening. Bury Art Museum, 11 March, 5pm-8pm, free

EVENT. Girl Gang Manchester #1: Mean Girls

Ancoats’ Hope Mill Theatre is transformed into North Shore’s Spring Fling for an immersive screening of Mean Girls. Complete with interactive elements from the film such as a Reclaim Your Shame Anti-Burn Book and a candy cane post box, the event includes a variety of creative and empowering workshops. The Ultimate Mean Girls Quiz, a mini market of local female-run businesses, a film introduction, pop-up performances, Girl Gang’s trademark party bags and a female power anthem danceathon keep the event going into the early hours. Awarded Best Single Event at the national Cinema for All Awards after its first outing in Sheffield, Girl Gang journeys to Manchester, completely re-made with a local team of female creatives. Hope Mill Theatre, 11 & 12 March, 6.30pm-2am, £12.

EVENT. Being Childfree with Kate Fox

Kate Fox has always known she didn’t want children (though she wouldn’t mind giving birth to spaniels). She began developing a stand up show to explore the topic in 2013 and was surprised at the positive response of both parents and non-parents, and at how common choosing to be child-free is. She realised how many people are still stigmatised for choosing not to be parents (especially women). Kate’s choice of comedy as a medium to explore the issues reflects her belief that the complex set of personal, social and economic issues that are involved in having, or not, having children needs to be talked about more openly and freely. 70 Oxford Street, 11 March, 6pm-9pm, free, booking required.

Saturday 12 March

EVENT. Sacred Sounds Woman’s Choir at Elizabeth Gaskell’s House

The 50 strong Sacred Sounds Woman’s Choir host an afternoon of celebration in the inspirational surroundings of Elizabeth Gaskell’s House. Come along for a cup of tea and learn about what they do, take part in their singing and vocal workshop and join the choir in a performance in the beautiful Victorian Entrance Hall. Sacred Sounds was created in 2013 as part of Manchester International Festival. They bring together women to explore and celebrate the many languages, cultures and religions represented across Manchester, with the aim of promoting peace, compassion and understanding through song. Elizabeth Gaskell’s House, 12 March, 12-3pm, free.

EVENT. Women’s Lit at The Portico

The Portico Library will be assembling some of its most interesting volumes by or about  women to share with visitors. Discover biographies on extraordinary individuals, written accounts by intrepid travelers and women in the home and garden; this feast of books will show you the wonderful world of the 19th century woman, in her many and varied modes. Come and spread the knowledge by tweeting your favorite book covers, titles, pictures and quotes to @ThePortico. The Portico, 12 March, 12 – 2pm, free drop in

EVENT. Dear Friend Letter-Writing workshop

Dear Friend is an online letter-writing project celebrating women who stood up for others, both in the past and present. Explore the Friends and Families of Lesbians and Gays archive, learn the stories of the women who supported their relatives and LGBT allies and write a letter to the women who’ve made a difference in your life. This workshop is designed for young people aged 14-25. Manchester Central Library, 12 March, 2pm-4pm, free 

EVENT. Pankhurst in the Park 2016 presents: Legacy Fatale

Alexandra Arts kicks off the Pankhurst in the Park 2016 programme with New York based collective Legacy Fatale. A performance choreography group founded in 2008 by artists Coco Dolle and Shawn Bishop, that revisits the ancient nomadic warrior women of the Amazon. The collective represents a hybrid breed of historic and pop cultural icons, a cross-pollination of mythical and contemporary female archetypes. Their commissioned choreography piece is a fusion of Mrs Pankhurst’s ‘Suffrajitsu’ bodyguards – the elite secret society of “Amazons”, women trained in the martial art of Bartitsu – and an animal print extravaganza that will be popping up and across the city between 8-11 March, leading up to ‘Wonder Warrior’. An interactive performance for Pankhurst in the Park 2016’s official launch party with DJ Andrea Trout, at ‘Tea Hive’ Pavilion in Alexandra Park on March 12th, 2016. Suitable for ages 18+, ‘Tea Hive’ Pavilion, Alexandra Park, 6pm-12am, free

PERFORMANCE. The Hard Way Up

The People’s History Museum presents ‘The Hard Way Up – a Suffragettes Story’ in the setting of Lark Hill Place at Salford Museum and Art Gallery. Celebrate International Women’s Day with a Living History performance based on the life of suffragette Hannah Mitchell, who spoke out for women and the poor and became a peace campaigner after World War I. Please note the audience will be mainly standing for the performance. Salford Museum and Art Gallery, 12 March, 11am-2pm, £2, no booking required

EVENT. Sugar and Spice 10: Women Out Loud

Sugar & Spice is Manchester’s annual free International Women’s Day celebration for lesbian and bisexual women at LGBT Foundation with two days of networking, workshops, discussions, creativity and cake. LGBT Foundation and various venues, 12 March, free

Sunday 13 March

EVENT. Girls in the Game

An introductory coding workshop for young people looking into the science of computer gaming. Taking inspiration from the success of the England Ladies in 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup, girls football team, coding clubs, Brownies and museum visitors are invited to use computer coding to put girls at the heart of football games and celebrate all that women and girls have achieved so far in computer coding. National Football Museum, 13 March, 11am-4pm, free, ages 6 – 11, limited places

EVENT. Sugar and Spice 10: Women Out Loud

Sugar & Spice is Manchester’s annual free International Women’s Day celebration for lesbian and bisexual women at LGBT Foundation with two days of networking, workshops, discussions, creativity and cake. LGBT Foundation and various venues, 13 March, free

Make It Happen City Centre Trail

Celebrate International Women’s Day with Green Badge Tour Guide, Suzanne Hindle, on a walking tour around Manchester city centre. Uncover the stories of historical and modern Manchester women and find out about their contribution to harmony through radicalism, war effort, nursing, science and community work. Suitable for over 10s. People’s History Museum, 13 March, 2pm-4pm, SOLD OUT.

Throughout

THEATRE. Husbands and Sons

Interweaving three of DH Lawrence’s greatest dramas, Husbands & Sons introduces us to the village of Eastwood, which sits in the shadow of the great Brinsley pit. Its heroes are the women – the wives, mothers and daughters trying to hold their families and their own souls together. Directed by Marianne Elliott and featuring Anne-Marie Duff. Royal Exchange Theatre, 19 Feb-19 March, tickets £10/£16

EXHIBITION. Feminism is Dead

This exhibition examines the different portrayals of what it means to be a feminist in modern society, including the idea that it is ‘man hating’. It will look at what it really means to be a feminist in 2016 and the issues that feminists are fighting for and against. It aims to disprove the idea that feminism is no longer necessary. People’s History Museum, 3-31 March, 10am-5pm, free 

EXHIBITION. Big-Up Female Boffins

As part of the Manchester Science City 2016 celebrations, Warp & Weft use the power of crochet to champion the achievements of female scientists. They will be Yarnbombing four of the male statues on the ground floor of Manchester Town Hall with masks representing female Mancunian boffins. Flying a ‘BIG-UP FEMALE BOFFINS’ banner, Warp & Weft highlight women’s varied contributions to science despite the barriers in their way. Stargazing statistician Kathleen Ollerenshaw; pioneering Egyptologist Margaret Murray; the botanist who saved Japan’s sushi industry, Kathleen Drew-Baker; and founder of Manchester Babies Hospital Dr Catherine Chisholm will all been celebrated. Manchester Town Hall, 1-31 March, free

EXHIBITION. Women’s Voices Changing Manchester

To reflect and mark International Women’s Day, Manchester collective Crafters Inc. proudly present an exhibition celebrating the diverse and distinct voices of female Manchester-based artists, both empowering and empowered through making. A diverse background of artists exhibits a range of disciplines from fine art and photography, to graphic design and jewellery art. Manchester Craft and Design Centre, 5-11 March, free

EXHIBITION: Honey and Tar

An exhibition of emerging women artists, illustrators and photographers working in the city today hang in Soup Kitchen throughout Wonder Women festival. Soup Kitchen, 3-13 March, free

Past Events

Thursday 3 March

EVENT. Instigate Arts present: What IS She Wearing?

From the Suffragettes to Red Lipstick Day, the Slut Walks and the Pussy Riots to butch and drag, women have long utilised that which is used to restrict them to strive for freedom and an identity on their own terms. Through an evening of intersectional feminist debate, performance and film, Instigate Arts explore the aesthetics of protest and consider how clothing and style are used to shape, define and own gender, sexuality and identity. Manchester Art Gallery, 3 March, 5pm-8pm, free

EXHIBITION. Freedom or Death? The Women’s Suffrage Movement

John Rylands Library holds key archives of the women’s suffrage movement in early 19th century Britain. Join them as they look at original documents providing a captivating insight into the social and economic, as well as political position of women in the early twentieth century. John Rylands Library, 3 March, 2pm-3pm, free

EVENT. Honey and Tar exhibition launch, and Teasers Pleasers

Honey and Tar, an exhibition of photography, contemporary art, illustration and video art from emerging artists working in Manchester runs at Soup Kitchen throughout Wonder Women festival. Featured artists include Aliyah Hussain, Emily Tilzey, Lulu Heal, Ella Deacy, Isabel Scott, Hannah Farrell, Ruby Robinson and Caroline Dowsett. Celebrate the launch of Honey and Tar with Soup Kitchen residents Teasers Pleasers who will be playing an all-female set with music from the likes of Laurie Anderson, Yoko Ono, and more. Soup Kitchen, 3 March, 6pm- 12am, free

EVENT: Twerkshop with Fannie Sosa

Take part in a very special Twerkshop run by Fannie Sosa as part of the relaunch of the Birth Rites Collection at University of Salford. Sosa is a nomadic activist, PhD candidate and High Priestess of Twerk. She creates round spaces to exchange knowledge, gather strength and nurture people – especially women and genderfluid identified bodies of colour. Spaces are limited to 25 people- please email helen@birthrites.org.uk to book your free place. School of Nursing Midwifery and Social Care, Mary Seacole Building, 2nd Floor, University of Salford, Salford, M6 6PU, 12.30pm. Free, booking required via email. 

Friday 4 March

DISCUSSION. What are we chaining ourselves to the railings for today? A discussion on modern feminism

From the suffragettes to Pussy Riot, women have chained themselves to the railings in name of feminism across history. As part of the People’s History Museum’s look at modern feminism, they will discuss ways in which modern feminism could improve to include the voices of a more diverse range of women. What would women of colour, trans women, women of different faiths and gay and bisexual women chain themselves to the railings for? They will invite a number of women to give their views on the topic and then open up the discussion to the floor. Suitable for adults and young people. People’s History Museum, 4 March, 6pm-8pm, SOLD OUT

EVENT. 16 Days of Street Art Action: Free Art Friday

16 days of Street Art Action take part in the global Free Art Friday movement with 16 female artists from the North West taking to the streets, sharing a piece of original art work in a hidden location in Manchester’s Northern Quarter. Each piece of art is inspired by a Wonder(ful) Woman. Check the 16 Days of Street Art Action Twitter and Facebook accounts for locations of the hidden art; the first person to find a piece of artwork, keeps it! Northern Quarter, Various locations, 4 March, 10am-5pm, free

TALK. Lightning Talks in The Study

Don your white coat for this talk in The Study at Manchester Museum, celebrating female ingenuity with incredible women from University of Manchester. This event is for adults. Themes for the talks include ‘The Suffragette Bike Ride and Tea Party’, ‘Families getting by in Austerity’, ‘The Development of Education for Women in Saudi’ and ‘Enabling Women to Grow their Own Food in Kenya’ . The Study at Manchester Museum, 4 March, 12pm-2pm, free (drop in)

Saturday 5 March

EVENT. Gifts for the Gods: Secrets of animal mummification in ancient Egypt

Take part in a hands-on practical science workshop based around Manchester Museum’s current exhibition, Gifts for the Gods; Animal mummies revealedGifts for the Gods is based on cutting edge bioarchaeological research conducted by Dr.Stephanie Atherton-Woolham and Dr Lidija McKnight from The Ancient Egyptian Animal Bio Bank Project based at the University of Manchester. Their work uses modern scientific techniques to catalogue data from animal mummies in museum collection around the world. During the hands on workshop participants will take on the role of the researcher and use analytical methods such as CT scans and light microscopy to reveal the secrets of animal mummification and find out what lies beneath the bandages of three of the animal mummies on display. An event showcasing Manchester’s tradition of being home to brilliant female scientists. Manchester Museum, 5 March, 1.30pm-3.30pm adults only, free, booking required

EXHIBITION. Who’s Your Wonder Woman?

Manchester has produced some remarkable women and these pioneering people have made a significant contribution to how we live our lives today. To celebrate this, John Rylands Library delve into their Special Collections to showcase the achievements of some of the city’s most innovative women. John Rylands Library, 5 March, 2pm-3pm, free

TALK. Remembering Mary Barbour – social reformer, rent strike leader, women’s peace crusader and pioneering woman councillor

Social reformer Mary Barbour worked tirelessly to change laws to help families in poverty.  In this talk Catriona Burness discusses Barbour’s capacity to mobilise working class families, especially women, to challenge the power of landlords and the state during the 1915 Govan rent strike led to the passing of one of Europe’s first rent restriction acts.  A discussion will focus on how Barbour’s work fighting for free school milk, children’s playgrounds, municipal wash-houses and an end to slum housing relate to current issues today. Working Class Movement Library, Salford, 5 March, 2pm-4pm, free

EVENT. Women in the First World War

A one-day symposium on women’s contributions to WWI. Activities include presentations on women’s writing, journalism and visual representations of women war workers, as well as creative workshops and a performance of wartime diaries and letters. A guided tour of the museum exhibitions will be followed by an evening reception. In partnership with Manchester Metropolitan University. Suitable for adults and young people over 11. People’s History Museum, 5 March, 10.30am-4.30pm, tickets £10/£20

EVENT. The Fabric of Protest

What are the issues facing women in Manchester today? Participants will reflect on positive changes for women made over the last 100 years, and look at what needs to change for the future as we approach the 2018 centenary of women gaining the right to vote for the first time. Using a range of protest materials, including ribbons, rosettes, patches, flags and badges, artist Helen Mather will ask members of the public to contribute with their slogan for change. Individual voices will combine to produce a collective response to where women are today in society, producing a piece of art rich in ideas, materials and visual impact. This event has supported with a grant from Manchester City Council. Suitable for adults and young people. People’s History Museum, 5 March, 1pm-3pm, booking required, suggested £3 donation.

Sunday 6 March

EVENT. Badass Women On The Walls

Some of history’s best stories have been deliberately forgotten; this workshop brings back to life some of our most badass women. Work with the Digital Women’s Archive North, Dr Jenna Ashton and some of the best Northern female artists and tell the story of some of the worst behaved Northern women in history. The People’s History Museum will exhibit the art created in Manchester city centre throughout March to celebrate International Women’s Day. This event is A City Speaks workshop run by Symmetry Creative in collaboration with Wonder Women Festival and the People’s History Museum. Suitable for adults and young people. People’s History Museum, 6 March, 1pm-3pm, SOLD OUT.

EVENT. The Passion and Power of Female Friendship: Discussing the Wonder Women in Young Adult literature

Best selling Young Adult fiction authors Holly Bourne (Am I Normal Yet?, How Hard Can Love Be?) and Eve Ainsworth (Seven Days, Crush) discuss the female friendships that have inspired them in books, film and TV, why they’ve chosen to write their own, and why they believe positive depictions of female friendships are vital for Young Adult readers. This event runs before an afternoon screening of Claudia Weill’s 1978 film Girlfriends. HOME, 6 March, 2pm, £3 (including refreshments)

FILM. Introduced film screening: Playing a Part – The Story of Claude Cahun

Join filmmaker, Lizzie Thynne, for an introduced screening of her film Playing a Part: The Story of Claude Cahun. Claude Cahun, a member of the French Surrealist movement, used her art and photography to defy norms of gender and identity. While living in Nazi-occupied Jersey during the Second World War, Cahun and her partner and step sister, Marcel Moore, mounted an extraordinary resistance campaign. Part art, part propaganda, they employed the identity of a fictitious disaffected German soldier and distributed handmade anti-Nazi leaflets, written in almost fluent German, in places where German Servicemen would find them around the island. It took four years for the Germans to discover that the couple were behind it. Following the screening, Lizzie will be in conversation with Jackie Stacey, Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at University of Manchester on the topic of Art as a form of resistance. Imperial War Museum North6 March, 2.30pm (Recommended age 14 yrs+), free, no booking required.

FILM. Girlfriends

Lena Denham’s Girls’ and Frances Ha’s recent portraits of young women’s confusion and co-dependency have made a phenomenon out of a brand of New York neurosis that is distinctly female. But almost 40 years before these works, debut director Claudia Weill wrote and directed this woefully neglected gem about Susan, a struggling photographer who is forced to fend for herself when her roommate Anne decides to get married. This screening features an introduction and post-screening discussion led by Jemma Desai, the founder of I am Dora, a curatorial initiative that explores how women relate to one another through the medium of film. HOME, 6 March, 4.20pm. SOLD OUT

MUSIC. Here Come the Grrrls: Showcase

Brighter Sound celebrates International Women’s Day with a showcase evening featuring performances from some of the many talented musicians they have worked with over the last twelve months.  Over the course of an evening, they welcome back Wall of Sounds Beth Orton residency musicians, including Natalie McCool, Becca Williams, Elizabeth Vince, Avital Raz, Ione Mai, Gina Tratt, Fiona Soe Paing, Kayla Painter, Sonia Allori and Vanessa James.  Band on the Wall, 6 March, 7pm, free, booking required.

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