Manchester Jewish Museum

Kate Feld
Manchester Jewish Museum small museums andrew anderson
Image courtesy of Manchester Jewish Museum

Manchester Jewish Museum, 190 Cheetham Hill Road, Manchester, M8 8LW – Visit Now

We discover a historic gem of a museum – and one with very grand plans.

Manchester Jewish Museum is one of those places I’ve been meaning to get to for years. I must have passed it hundreds of times on my way into or out of the city. But its location on Cheetham Hill Road is… well, the kind of place you find yourself driving past a lot. This is a pity, for, as I discovered on my maiden visit, it’s well worth the schlep.

The museum building itself is a Grade II-listed former Spanish and Portuguese Synagogue completed in 1874 – the oldest surviving synagogue in Manchester, its ornate, decorative features beautifully preserved. Moving around exhibits housed in the former ladies’ gallery mezzanine, you learn about the community established by Jews came to this part of Manchester from all over the world to make a life for themselves and their families; to put down roots, safe from the persecution, pogroms and expulsions, ghettoisation and outright genocide. And put down roots they did. Over the last 200 years, Manchester’s Jewish community – some 40,000 people based mainly in an area encompassing Broughton, Whitefield, Prestwich, Crumpsall and Cheetham Hill – has become the UK’s largest outside London.

The future looks bright for Manchester Jewish Museum, which has seen many changes since opening in 1984.  The conversion of part of the venue into an exhibition space has enabled it to mount changing exhibitions such as the excellent Chagall, Soutine and The School of Paris. CEO, Max Dunbar showed me plans for an extension that will help show the permanent collection to its best advantage, improving on the museum’s admittedly cramped displays. This will improve on what is already a tremendous resource to schools in the city; the museum undertakes a broad range of educational programmes about Jewish religion and culture, the Holocaust and prejudice and discrimination.

A lively events series featuring authors, artists and notable Jewish figures in British culture attracts new audiences to the venue; writers Jay Rayner and Howard Jacobsen have appeared over recent years and Manchester Literature Festival has used the venue to great effect. MJM even organises tours in which representatives from the community guide visitors around contemporary Jewish Manchester, visiting shops, restaurants and institutions.  It’s a great way to experience living history, and learn about one of the many crisscrossing stories that make our city the rich, diverse and colourful place it is. Like other small museums on our radar, it’s worth the schlep.

  • 190 Cheetham Hill Road
  • Manchester
  • M8 8LW
  • View map

Opening Hours

  • Mon: 10:00am – 4:00pm
  • Tue: 10:00am – 4:00pm
  • Wed: 10:00am – 4:00pm
  • Thu: 10:00am – 4:00pm
  • Fri: 10:00am – 1:00pm
  • Sat: Closed
  • Sun: 10:00am – 4:00pm
  • Always double check opening hours with the venue before making a special visit

Admission Charges

£4.50/£3.50 Conc.

Services and Facilities

Museum, gallery, shop and garden area

Because of the ongoing Coronavirus crisis, we are unable to bring you our usual recommendations for things to do in Manchester and the North. Our thoughts at this time are with our readers and with the organisations and businesses who make the North of England a great place to live and visit. We hope you stay well and look forward to sharing more unmissable events and places with you later in the year.

Here’s our guide to supporting organisations in Manchester and the North.

Please note – many of the venues on our site will be closed and events either postponed or cancelled. Please check the venue website for details.