HOME Artist Film Weekender 2020

Tom Grieve, Cinema Editor
April Lin 林森 - Image courtesy of HOME

Artist Film Weekender 2019 at HOME Manchester, Manchester, 3–6 December 2020, from £3 - Book now

HOME’s Artist Film Weekender is back with a range of films, talks, panel discussions, reading groups and exploratory essays available in an online format for 2020. For this year, the cinema’s annual dive into artist film arrives with a programme curated by Jamie Allan and Alice Wilde, dedicated to the power, politics and pleasure of togetherness.

Conceived in reaction to the isolation and division we have seen this year, the concept of togetherness is one which manifests differently across the weekend. There is a selection of films from the Karrabing Film Collective, a grassroots Indiginous media group consisting of over thirty members, based in the Northern Territory, Australia. An exercise in literal togetherness, their practice conceives of work through communal thinking and collective experimentation — founding member and critical theorist Elizabeth A. Povinelli also presents a masterclass in collective filmmaking.

Also from Australia, Terror Nullis is a political revenge fable and rewriting of Mad Max 2, in which two-person collective Soda_Jerk populate George Miller’s classic film with anti-colonial insurgents and a feminist motorcycle gang. The films of Portuguese filmmaker Pedro Neves Marques look towards science fiction too. HOME present a Q&A and a series of the artist’s work, which invites us into speculative worlds featuring non-binary lovers, genetically-engineered mosquitos and indiginous androids where “care, love and mutual awareness are essential to our beyond-human interconnectedness.”

Terror Nullis
Terror Nullis

Artist-filmmaker April Lin 林森 will also be virtually present for a Q&A alongside a streaming programme of four short film works. Billed as part of the “post-Internet” generation, the work interweaves autobiography, performance, documentary and world building to explore ideas of rest, death and collaboration in our contemporary, digital world. Meanwhile, from London and Berlin-based Black trans artist Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley comes interactive film, Moisturizing — a work that uses video game aesthetics and technologies in order to foreground and archive the black trans experience.

As always, the Artist Film Weekender boasts contributions from around the globe, but there is plenty of UK-based artist film too, including a series of films celebrating the UK’s Black Film Workshop Movement. While Philip Trevelyan’s British cult classic The Moon and the Sledgehammer — an ever-relevant piece focused on a self-sufficient family’s freedom to explore their personal obsessions from isolated woodland outside of London — gets a 50th anniversary outing.

HOME’s Artist Film Weekender provides an accessible, affordable online space in which to commune with the world of artist film and its practitioners

Moving from South Manchester, to the United States Library of Congress, to Nigeria, “In response to the archive: A curated programme by Hope Strickland” is a trio of films from Hope Strickland, Tamika Galanis and Onyeka Igwe. Using archive footage and documentary interviews, the films explore memory and the archive, with subjects ranging from the experiences of the Windrush generation and Caribbean women, to Igwe’s relationship with her grandfather’s stories.

While the physical festival experience lies just out of reach, HOME’s Artist Film Weekender provides an accessible, affordable online space in which to commune with the world of artist film and its practitioners. If you’d like to dip your toe in, then individual tickets are available on a pay-what-you-can basis ranging from free to £3. For those looking to immerse themselves, the full Weekender pass is available for just £8.

Artist Film Weekender 2019 at HOME Manchester, Manchester

3–6 December 2020
From £3